Participating in World Book Night 2014

Last year was the first year that the Barrow Media Center participated in World Book Night.  It was such a fun and rewarding experience, that I knew we had to do it again.  On World Book Night, each “giver” receives 20 copies of a certain book to hand out in the community.  The process is really simple.  A few months before April, applications open.  You submit an simple application explaining how you will hand out the books.  If your application is approved, you select where you will pickup your books.  I always pick mine up at our local independent bookstore, Avid Bookshop.  They hold an event where givers can meet one another and exchange of ideas of how to hand out the books in the community.  Then, on April 23, you hand out your books.

Here’s a little more from the World Book Night website,

World Book Night is an annual celebration dedicated to spreading the love of reading, person to person.  Each year on April 23, tens of thousands of people go out into their communities and give half a million free World Book Night paperbacks to light and non-readers.

World Book Night is about giving books and encouraging reading in those who don’t regularly do so. But it is also about more than that: It’s about people, communities and connections, about reaching out to others and touching lives in the simplest of ways—through the sharing of stories.

World Book Night is a nonprofit organization. We exist because of the support of thousands of book givers, booksellers, librarians, and financial supporters who believe in our mission. Successfully launched in the U.K. in 2011, World Book Night was first celebrated in the U.S. in 2012.

This year, my book was Zora and Me by Victoria Bond and T.R. Simon.  I was so happy that this was the book I was selected to give because it’s a book that I’ve hoped many of our students would pick up.  Rather than randomly hand the book out in our community, I decided to target specific students in our school.  Teachers in 4th and 5th grade helped me select 20 students via a Google doc.  Each student was chosen for various reasons.  There was no set in stone way to choose a student other than we wanted to put the book in the hands of a student who could use a new book in their home library and who would enjoy reading this book.

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At 1:00, all of the students came to the library.  I told them about World Book Night and we visited the World Book Night website.   I told them about being a giver and picking up my books at Avid Bookshop.  Then, I showed them the book.  We visited the Candlewick site where we could watch a trailer for Zora and Me.  I read the back of the book to all of the students.

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Then, I got to say the words I was so excited to say…”I’m giving a copy of Zora and Me to all of you.  Every single student was so excited.  Some of them jumped up to help pass them out to the group.  I loved watching them immediately open the book and start reading it.  I also gave them all a bookmark.

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I told them that my hope is that they would read the entire book, share it with their families, tell me what they thought of, and cherish the book as a part of their home libraries.  I look forward to hearing from them very soon.  One student told me she would probably have it finished by tomorrow!

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World Book Night is an amazing experience.  It seems small when you first sign up, but you are filled with emotion when you put your book in someone’s hand with the wish that they will read it and love it.

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2014 Battle of the Books 3rd & 4th Grade

IMG_2860Today was our 3rd and 4th grade Battle of the Books.  Students in these grades read the same 10 books.  We build our battle of the books program in stages from 3rd through 5th grade.  Each year, we add a few layers to the competition.

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Natalie Hicks, spectrum teacher, leads our 3rd grade program.  In 3rd grade, students focus on reading the books for enjoyment and working together on a team.  We still hold a competition for them, but it is very low key.  All teams are in the final battle.  Each team gets 10 questions during the competition, but if they miss a question, the question does not get passed on to a new team.  The team with the most points at the end of this small competition is named the grade level winner.

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Heather Carlson, spectrum teacher, leads our 4th grade program.  In 4th grade, all teams compete with one another in the final battle.  However, if a team misses a question, the next team has a chance to answer the same question for a lower point value.  Teams can also challenge a question if they feel that their answer was actually correct.

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In 5th grade, we do the full battle of the books.  We have 2 rounds of competition with all of the teams.  The points from those 2 rounds are added together to decide who battles in the final battle.  The final battle has 20 questions and teams can steal questions from the other team as well as challenge questions.  The winning team from 5th grade moves on to the district competition.  There is no district competition for 3rd and 4th grade.

Many thanks to all of the classroom teachers, families, and students who make this annual program a success.  You can listen to today’s competition at the following 2 links:

 

Watch the 3rd grade battle

 

Watch the 4th grade battle

2014 Battle of the Books District Champions!

IMG_2765Today was our district battle of the books.  Our school level champions, the Rainbow Glitter Sweet Tooths, represented Barrow at this year’s district competition.

To get to this point, this team of 5 girls has spent time since December reading and rereading the 10 books for this year’s battle.  They competed against 5 other teams at the school level to become the school champions.  They spent hours upon hours practicing questions at school and at home to prepare for today.

At the district competition, the 14 elementary schools all brought their winning school team to compete against one another.  The girls participated in 2 rounds of 20 questions.  The points in those rounds were totaled and the top 2 scores moved on to the final battle.  Barrow batted against Timothy Road Elementary in the final.

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The 2 final teams had 20 new questions for the final battle.  It was an extremely close battle because both of these teams were strong.  The questions went back and forth with Barrow and Timothy both getting almost every question correct.  The points were so close, but Barrow came ahead with just a few points above Timothy.  Both of these teams should be extremely proud of their hard work.

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When we returned to school, the entire 5th grade lined the hallways and cheered on the team as they walked to the library for a pizza and cookie cake celebration.  We are all exhausted, but very proud.  The girls immediately checked out some new books in the library.  They have spent so much time with the 10 battle books that they are eager to move on to many new adventures in reading.

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Way to represent Barrow School Cate, Irene, Sophia, Italia, and Lauren, aka the Rainbow Glitter Sweet Tooths!  We are so very proud of you.

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Poem In Your Pocket: Live Poetry Cafe 2014 Day 2

Poem In Pocket Day 2 (6)Yesterday, I posted about our annual Poem In Your Pocket Day Cafe.  Today, 13 more classes came to share poetry into our open microphone.  It was a non-stop day filled with wonderful words.  As usual, there were many special moments like a student sharing a poem in Chinese and having his class give him the biggest round of snaps I’ve ever heard.  Listen to their poetry sessions at the links below.

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Boyle Kindergarten

Li Kindergarten

Olin 5th Grade

Watson 1st Grade

Freeman 5th Grade

Brink 2nd Grade

Shealey 4th Grade

Hocking Kindergarten

Ramseyer 2nd Grade

Doneda PreK

Selleck 5th grade

Seeling 4th grade

Stuckey 1st Grade

Poem In Pocket Day 2 (105)

 

We loved having special guests join us online today:

Jovette Francoeur, educational consultant in Montreal, Quebec.

Grandparents in Goshen, CT

Mary Morgan Ryan, librarian in  Illinois

Grandparents from Illinois

Kevin & Diane Fuchs, uncle & aunt from Indiana

Grandparents in Florida

Friends in Boston

Mrs. Hinger, librarian at Clarke Middle School in Athens

And so many more.

Each year, this day holds many special memories for it.  Each year we add something new.  I would love to hear your ideas for how this  event could grow and change next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poem In Your Pocket: Live Poetry Cafe 2014 Day 1

Poem In Pocket 2014 Day 1 (55)Each year during national poetry month, we host a live poetry cafe in the library.  This event has grown from 1 day to 2 days.  It is our way of celebrating National Poem in Your Pocket Day, even though it usually falls on a day other than the national celebration.  Across the 2 days, every student in the school comes to the library to read poetry into our open microphone.

The tables are set with tablecloths, lanterns, flowers, and some paper flowers, too.

Poem In Pocket 2014 Day 1 (4) Poem In Pocket 2014 Day 1 (5) Poem In Pocket 2014 Day 1 (3)

Each year, we try to add something new.  This year, we added some cozy seating among the tables so that students could feel a bit closer to the student reading his or her poem.

Poem in Your Pocket Poetry Cafe   Smore

This year, we also used a Smore to promote the event and keep everything collected in one spot.  The Smore held our schedule, link for logging in to watch the poems, pictures from the event, and links to the videos once they were recorded.  I also loved that the analytics in the Smore allowed us to see all of the places that our event was being glanced at.

Poem in Your Pocket Poetry Cafe   Smore stats

This year, we also added Twitter to the mix by generating our own hashtag #BarrowPoems

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I used Twitterfall to display the tweets coming through, and the students loved seeing each and every one.  Sometimes I would take a comment out of the chat and tweet it for visitors who didn’t use Twitter themselves.  It was so much fun for the students to know that some of our familiar friends from World Read Aloud Day were watching at times during the day.  Okle Miller (Florida) and Donna MacDonald (Vermont) tuned in to listen.  We also had a library from Rhode Island join us too.

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It was a lot to manage all by myself, but it was fun.  It is truly amazing to watch almost every student in the school get up in front of their peers and share poetry.  It was also inspiring to watch as students stood with their peers who were nervous about sharing.

I hope that you have a few moments to listen to some of the poetry sessions below and share them with friends, families, and students around the world.

Ramsey 3rd Grade

Choate Kindergarten

Em 1st Grade

Carney Kindergarten

Clarke PreK

Slongo 4th Grade

Spurgeon 3rd Grade

Yawn 2nd Grade 

Wright 2nd Grade

Wyatt 1st Grade

Cloutier/Jarvis 3rd Grade

 

We have another packed day tomorrow with poetry readings every 30 minutes from 8-2:30 EST.  Join us!

 

2014 Barrow Poem In Your Pocket Days are Coming April 3 & 4

The official National Poem In Your Pocket Day is April 24 this year.  Since this date is mixed into our state testing days, we celebrate a bit earlier at Barrow.  Over the past few years, Poem In Your Pocket Day has grown into a 2-day event in our library.  Every class comes to the library across 2 days.  I setup the library like a coffee shop or cafe with a poetic atmosphere:  tables with colorful tablecloths, lanterns, lighting, and a microphone.  Each student steps up to the microphone to share an original or a favorite poem and we celebrate each poem with lots of finger snaps.

Also each year, we have been broadcasting our poetry reading live via Adobe Connect.  This year we will continue this tradition.  I’ve created a Smore to show our schedule and to have access to the login link.

Poem in Your Pocket Poetry Cafe   Smore

To view our poetry readings, you simply visit the Adobe Connect link and sign in as a guest.  You will see students reading their poetry and also have a chat window to leave comments for them. To spread the love of Barrow poems to the world, we also encourage you to tweet about our poetry using the hashtag #BarrowPoems  We invite you to tune in to some or all of our readings.  The schedule is packed for 2 whole days.  Our students love knowing that they have a global audience listening and celebrating their poetry.  We will see you next week!

Thursday April 3, 2014

Time

Class

8:30

Ramsey

9:00

Choate

9:30

Em

10:00

Carney

10:30

Clarke

11:00

Slongo

11:30

12:00

Spurgeon

12:30

Yawn

1:00

Wright

1:30

Wyatt

2:00

Jarvis

Friday April 4, 2014

Time

Class

8:00

Boyle

8:30

Li

9:00

Olin

9:30

Watson

10:00

Freeman

10:30

Brink

11:00

Shealey

11:30

12:00

Ramseyer

12:30

Doneda

1:00

Selleck

1:30

Seeling

2:00

Stuckey

 

 

How Our Library Space Supports Book Fair and an Open Library

We've had great success displaying our teacher wish lists on a three-dimensional display.

We’ve had great success displaying our teacher wish lists on a three-dimensional display.

Book fair is such an important part of our library.  I love seeing the energy that book fair brings to our teachers, families, and students.  Everyone loves to come and see what new books are at the book fair each time.  It gets new books into the home libraries of our students, and our wonderful PTA helps make sure that every student who wants a book gets one.  Book fair also extends our yearly budget.  Our student book budgets, 3D printing supplies, author visits, and many other things are supported by the funds raised at our book fairs.

In the past, book fair pretty much shut the library down as far as student checkout goes.  Because of our space being smaller and not flexible, the book fair cases blocked the shelves of our library.  Since I had a paraprofessional in the past, I continued to teach classes, but checkout stopped for a whole week.

Now that we are in our new space, our library is 100% accessible to students, teachers, and families thanks to our flexible design.  Our class schedule does slow down during book fair week since I pretty much run book fair by myself without a paraprofessional, but our wonderful parent volunteers step in and help when there are classes and projects that I need to continue with during book fair week.

Here’s a look at how our space transforms during book fair.

1.  Our circulation island stays completely accessible with storage underneath for books that need to be shelved.

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2.  The circulation area becomes a space that gets decorated with the fair theme.

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3.  The purple counter with attached case becomes the dividing point for our library.  Turn left and you enter the book fair.  Turn right and you go to the books, computers, instructional space, and lots of cozy reading/working spots.

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4.  Inside the fair, our rolling Fusion Flip tables push together to create larger tables.  Our smaller student desk tables push together to make larger tables, too.  Single desks are used for things like our book plate and flyer display.

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5.  Our purple counter becomes the cashier station and the attached case makes a great place to display posters.

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The back of the case remains accessible to our graphic novels and holiday books.

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6.  Inside the fair, we leave a space to get to the equipment room and our ipad cart can easily be rolled out the side door to go to classes.  We also leave a space to enter the room with the 3D printer and studio equipment.

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7.  Since pretty much every table in the library is used to display the fair, there are a lot of extra chairs.  Those are all stacked in the corner, but not in the way at all.

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8.  The book fair is in the spot where our fiction and 2 iMac computers usually sit, so those have been moved to one of the 2 instructional areas of the library.

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9.  Some of the nonfiction shelving is circled up to create a little more space for large groups to sit in front of our projection area.  During book fair, we had an author visit with the entire 2nd grade and we will Skype with an author on Thursday as well.

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Some of our green cushions have been pulled over the projection area for small groups to sit and work with the projector.  They get pushed out of the way for larger groups.

 

book fair space (10)

 

10.  Our everybody picture book section and nonfiction are in their usual spots.

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12.  The book fair is completely closed in by the cases and the purple counter with case.

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13.  Even without tables, students use the remaining furniture to find places to work.

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Flexible was the most important word that we kept coming back to in designing the space.  I wanted as few fixed pieces of furniture as possible.  This maximizes our space and allows it to grow or change on a daily basis if needed.  As we have progressed through the year, I’ve learned new ways of using and arranging the furniture each time I’ve moved it.   I’m sure there are tons of possibilities that we haven’t even discovered yet.

 

 

 

 

World Read Aloud Day 2014 (Day 5): Final Thoughts

Our final day of Read Across America and World Read Aloud Day was once again filled with special memories.

We read Crankee Doodle with Meghan Nels and her students.

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Matthew Winner and I got creative about how to read Open This Little Book with our students.

Matthew Winner (6) Matthew Winner (2)

Cathy Potter and I had fun reading I’m Bored and letting our students show the many ways you can say “boring”.

Cathy Potter (3) Cathy Potter (2)

Shawna Ford, Shannon Hyman, and I all found students to read parts of a reader’s theater of One Cool Friend.  We loved hearing voices in 3 states reading the story.

Shawna & Shannon (5) Shawna & Shannon (1)

Stacy Ford and I had a great time being Elephant and Piggie with our students as we read I’m a Frog.

Stacy Ford (5)

Randie Groden and I had some impromptu skyping as I had a class cancel!  Several 5th graders who were checking out books gathered around the projection area to meet her first graders and read Same, Same but Different.  Sometimes the unexpected is fun!

Randie Groden (4) Randie Groden (2) Randie Groden (1)

We ended our WRAD week with a connections between Shannon Miller and Barbara Terracciano along with author, Tom Angleberger.  He read aloud the part of Crankee in Crankee Doodle, and it was the perfect ending to our week.

Tom Angelberger (7) Tom Angelberger (2) Tom Angelberger (1)

There is not a day that goes by that I don’t read aloud.  Every day is read aloud day.

When I think of World Read Aloud Day, I think of connections.

Kate DiCamillo, National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature and 2-time Newbery winner, says “Stories Connect Us”.  In Extra Yarn by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Jon Klassen, all of the characters are connected to one another through strands of yarn as the main character knits sweaters for everything and everyone in sight.  In Same, Same but Different by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw, we learn that we really are all connected in the world by common strands of life even if those strands might look a bit different based on our cultures, locations, and beliefs.

World Read Aloud Day is about all of these things.  Even though we should read aloud every day, World Read Aloud Day raises our awareness of the importance of reading aloud.  It reminds us that when we read aloud, we connect.  When we read aloud, we expand our world.  When we read aloud, we learn that the world really isn’t as big as it seems.  We are all united through power of story and spoken word.

This year, our planning for World Read Aloud Day/Week began in December.  My wonderful friend and collaborator, Shannon Miller, created a Google Doc for educators around the world to use as a space to share their schedules and ideas.  The two of us shared the doc through blog posts, twitter, facebook, and conversations.  Over 3 months later, the doc is filled with conversations that each tell a story of a connection between multiple groups of students.  When you look at this single document, you know that students, teachers, teacher librarians, and families around the world are being impacted by powerful experiences of hearing stories read aloud, participating in conversations about books, and building connections to new friends around the world.

Our school:

  • engaged in 36 skype sessions
  • made 50 connections in these sessions
  • met new friends in 22 states and 2 other countries

Along the way, we built a Google Earth Tour using Google’s tour builder.  This tool allowed us to quickly add pins to a world map, add photographs and videos, and write a summary of each skype session and what we loved and learned.  I love how at the end of the week, we instantly have documentation that allows us to remember, reflect, and celebrate the fun that we have had during this week.

Google Tour

View our Google Tour Here!

Today, I received several thank you letters from students.  Organizing this many Skype sessions is exhausting.  I won’t lie about that, but the rewards that come from the hard work make up for all of the time I spent organizing this week.  Receiving these letters reminded me why I advocate for World Read Aloud Day and why I believe in the power of connecting with one another through story.  Thank you Litworld for creating such an amazing world-wide event.

World Read Aloud Day 2014 (Day 4)

Our skype connections continued today with 7 more fun read aloud experiences for our students.

Edie Crook Gastonia, NC
Okle Miller Tampa Fl
Cherie Smeltzer  New Hampshire
Shawna Ford  Texas
Jenny Lussier  e Connecticutt
Wendy Garland  Massachussetts
Shannon Miller Iowa

We started our day connecting with Edie Crook and her students in Gastonia, NC.  We had fund reading I’m Bored and then saying the word “boring” in different ways.

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Next, Okle Miller and I read aloud Same, Same but Different.  Our kids had fun talking about what was the same but different about life in Athens and Tampa.

Okle Miller (5) Okle Miller (3) Okle Miller (1)

We did our very first skype with PreK today when we connected with Cherie Smeltzer and her students.  They read Yes Day to us and we had fun thinking of what we would ask for on our own yes day.

Cherie Smeltzer (1) Cherie Smeltzer (2) Cherie Smeltzer (3) Cherie Smeltzer (7)

Shawna Ford’s students read Mr. Tiger Goes Wild to us, and I read Same, Same but Different to them.  We had a great discussion about the importance of reading picture books at every age.  Shawna compared it to how Disney movies have something that kids understand but some deeper meaning that mostly adults understand.  My kids really grabbed onto the idea.

Shawna Ford (3) Shawna Ford (2) Shawna Ford (1)

Jenny Lussier and I had a blast reading aloud Crankee Doodle to our students.  It is a hard book to read without cracking up!  I loved how our students suggested great books to read.

Jenny Lussier (3)

Wendy Garland and I read aloud This is Not My Hat.  Our students had a lot of opinions about what happened at the end.  We had a great discussion about the term “just right” and how this book was chosen as a “just right” book for our skype.

Wendy Garland (6) Wendy Garland (1)

I loved ending the day by reading aloud Flora & Ulysses to Shannon Miller’s students.  We had to get a bit creative on how to show the comics since Shannon’s copy was checked out, but we made it work.  The kids are all excited about the book and our copy that just arrived today was immediately checked out.

I can’t believe there’s only one day of connections left.  Tomorrow has several fun and surprising moments in store.  I can’t wait t end our week with some more great stories, authors, students, and librarians.

World Read Aloud Day 2014 (Day 3): The Official Day

World-Read-Aloud-Day-2014

Today is officially World Read Aloud Day.  We have been celebrating all week and will continue on Thursday and Friday.  Today can only be described as miraculous!  Here’s a look at our day.

We started by connecting with Donna MacDonald and her students in South Burlington, Vermont.  Our students did a reader’s theater of One Cool Friend.  We divided the parts up between our students so that voices in both states were helping to tell the story.  Students got a chance to find out about state symbols and the weather, but we loved meeting all of Mrs. MacDonald’s library pets!

Donna MacDonald (1) Donna MacDonald (5) Donna MacDonald (7) Donna MacDonald (9)

 

Next, we connected with Matthew Winner and his students in Elkridge, MD.  We shared the book The Story of Fish and Snail by Deborah Freedman.  We took turn reading pages.  He had 1st graders who read the pages with him, while I had Kindergarten where I read the pages.  Our students also had a chance to ask once another questions.

Matthew Winner (16) Matthew Winner (14) Matthew Winner (7) Matthew Winner (3) Matthew Winner (1)

 

Next, we began connecting with several authors.  Our first connection was with Anne Marie Pace.  She is the author of Vampirina Ballerina and Vampirina Ballerina Hosts a Sleepover.  During our connection, she taught the kids a great song about how a book is made and had them sing along.

Then, she read Vampirina Ballerina.  It has so many interesting vocabulary words.  On one page, she had the students stand up and dance with her to practice one of the ballet moves.

Another thing I love is when authors point out details in the illustrations and how they connect with the rest of the story.  Anne Marie pointed out Vampirina’s final pose and how it was the same pose as her ballet idol posted in her bedroom.

Anne Marie Pace (10) Anne Marie Pace (7) Anne Marie Pace (4) Anne Marie Pace (1) Anne Marie Pace (3)

 

Next, a very miraculous thing happened.  We skyped with Kate DiCamillo!  As you know, she has won 2 Newbery medals and has just been named the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature.  A few weeks ago we were contacted by the amazing people at LitWorld with an opportunity to be in a multi-school Skype.  I immediately said yes and the planning began.  Most of our 2nd grade attended with a few 3rd graders.  It was so inspiring.  We started with a roll call of schools.

Kate shared a poem from one of my favorite poets, Joyce Sidman.  Then, she started taking questions from schools.  This was followed by some reading from Flora & Ulysses.  The moderator also read aloud part of Kate’s first draft of Because of Winn Dixie, and I loved how Kate covered her ears because she didn’t want to hear how it sounded.

Kate DiCamillo (5)

 

Kate took some more questions from schools and ended by having the adults at each school share what they were reading to students.  When it came to me, I just had to tell Kate how I have read p. 130 of Flora & Ulysses numerous times to the students of Barrow and how “Expect the Miraculous” has become a mantra in our library and throughout our school.  She turned to p. 130, found the part, and read it aloud.  It was such a special moment (as you can see from my reaction at the end).

This was an amazing experience for our students.  They were hanging on every word and sat attentively for 1 hour and 15 minutes!  Our local newspaper was also in attendance to document the event.  I can’t thank LitWorld and Candlewick Press enough for this opportunity.  It was inspiring and definitely connected us with so many people through stories, which is Kate DiCamillo’s National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature platfrom.  During this call, we connected with the following schools along with Kate DiCamillo:

  • Mason-Rice Elementary School Newton, MA
  • Minnetonka Middle School West Minnetonka, MN
  • Van Meter Community School Van Meter, IA
  • Saint Mary Catholic School Paw Paw, MI
  •  Ducketts Lane Elementary School Elkridge, MD 
  • American School Foundation Mexico – ASFM Monterrey, Mexico
  • Roosevelt Elementary Jamestown, ND

Kate DiCamillo (12) Kate DiCamillo (6) Kate DiCamillo (2) Kate DiCamillo (3) Kate DiCamillo (4)

 

Later in the day, we connected with author Barbara O’Connor along with Sherry Gick and her students in Rossville, Indiana.  Barbara read aloud from How to Steal a Dog.

Then, students in each state had a chance to ask her some questions.  We learned about her 2 dogs, Martha & Ruby, as well as where the inspiration for the book came from.  Mrs. Wright’s 2nd grade class loved connecting since they had just finished the book as a class read aloud.

Barbara O'Connor (9) Barbara O'Connor (7) Barbara O'Connor (1)

 

Mrs. Stuckey’s class connected with author Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw and Shannon Miller’s students in Van Meter, IA.  She read her book Same, Same But Different.  We loved hearing her sing Kailash’s alphabet.

Then, she gave us a peek inside her art studio where we saw some paintings from her new book Luna and Me, which will be out in spring.  We can’t wait to see this book in print!  Students also got to ask her questions about her work.  It was fun to see her thought process as the author and illustrator of the book, and we learned that she does both together.

Jenny Sue (2)

 

We ended our day with the entire 5th grade skyping with author Tanya Lee Stone.  She read to us from Almost Astronauts.

This was followed by a chance for students to ask her questions.  They had several specific questions about the book, but we also learned how thorough Tanya is when she researches.  I loved that she included that she uses the Internet to research, but that she makes sure she is using reliable sources.  It was also fascinating to hear that books like Courage Has No Color took 10 years to write!  That was a powerful statement after students were complaining about a 2 hour writing test.

Tanya Lee Stone (6) Tanya Lee Stone (3) Tanya Lee Stone (1)

 

I love World Read Aloud Day.  I love sharing stories aloud, but even more than that, I love knowing that words are filling the air all around the world on this day and across this week.  I love that people are using social media to publicly profess their love of reading, their favorite books, and their celebrations of their freedom and right to read.  I love that stories really are connecting us to one another on this day and every time we share a story out loud.

Our celebration will continue for the next 2 days before we are off for spring break.  We will continue working on a Google Tour that will show all of our connections with a summary of each one.  Look for that in Friday’s post!  Happy World Read Aloud Day!